Home > UNFCCC COP 23 - SIDE EVENTS

Coverage of Selected Side Events at the Fiji / Bonn Climate Change Conference - November 2017

6-17 November 2017 | Bonn, Germany

Events Covered on Monday, 13 November 2017

Subscribe to ENBOTS Photo Usage Information

A view of the atrium in the new World Conference Center Bonn (WCCB), venue of the UN Climate Change Conference - November 2017

In an event hosted by the US Climate Action Alliance, US governors discussed actions they are taking to fight climate change and transition to clean energy.

On Sunday, 12 November 2017, IISD Reporting Services covered the following side event:

The following events were covered by IISD Reporting Services on Monday, 13 November 2017:

IISD Reporting Services, through its Earth Negotiations Bulletin on the Side (ENBOTS) Meeting Coverage, will provide daily web coverage from selected side events at the UN Climate Change Conference - November 2017.

Photos by IISD/ENB | Ángeles Estrada \
For photo reprint permissions, please follow instructions at our Attribution Regulations for Meeting Photo Usage Page.

Fast Action on Short-Lived Climate Pollutants to Keep Warming Well Below 2⁰C
(Climate and Clean Air Awards Ceremony)
Hosted by the Climate and Clean Air Coalition (CCAC)

Dan McDougall, CCAC Secretariat, introduced the Climate and Clean Air Awards ceremony, explaining that the Awards are designed to “recognize exceptional contributions and actions to implement projects, programmes, policies and practices that reduce short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs),” which is key to improving air quality and providing health benefits. Noting that the Secretariat received 38 nominations and 14 were shortlisted, he said the winners and nominees demonstrate real climate action.

Youba Sokona, Vice-Chair, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), presented Outstanding Policy Awards to: the State of California for establishing the most comprehensive and strongest set of targets on SLCPs in the US; and the National Petroleum Authority of Ghana for its action to reduce vehicle emissions.

Edmund Gerald Brown Jr., Governor of California, accepted the award on behalf of his state, noting that California’s short-term strategy will increase success in getting heat trapping gases under control.

Hassan Tampuli, CEO, National Petroleum Authority of Ghana, said that his company put restrictions on sulfur contents in imported diesel, permitting local companies to produce to slightly higher levels until 2020.

Manuel Pulgar-Vidal, WWF and former Minister of Environment, Peru, noting the relationship between climate, clean air and health, introduced the next three awards. He presented: Sameer Maithel, Director, Greentech Knowledge Solutions, with the award for Individual Achievement, for his efforts to reduce black carbon in India’s brick sector; Marcelo Mena Carrasco, Minister of Environment, Chile, with the Honorary Award for Individual Achievement, for his efforts to reduce air pollution in his country; and the International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT) with the Transformative Action award, for its initiative to “conduct checks of real-world emissions of diesel cars in the US.”

Maithel explained that the unprecedented population rise in his region had led to an increased demand for housing and infrastructure and, subsequently, bricks. He urged increasing the profile of clean technology in the sector, as it has environmental benefits, and provides affordable housing and sustainable jobs.

Mena Carrasco noted that air pollution is an environmental justice issue that is often overlooked in the climate agenda, and said that it was reduced by 51% in the last four years in his country.

Nic Lutsey, ICCT, accepted the award on behalf of his organization, explaining that their tests helped to reveal that Volkswagen vehicle emissions were 15-35 times higher than the US standard. He applauded the CCAC for funding technical research in this regard.

Mark Watts, Executive Director, C40 Cities, took the podium to present: Öresundskraft Kraft & Varme AB with the Innovative Technology Award for its work on District Cooling in Helsingborg, Sweden; and Durban (eThekwini) Municipality, South Africa with the Honorary Award for Innovative Technology for its Durban Landfill Conservancies project.

Gustaf Wiklund, Öresundskraft Kraft & Varme AB, explained that his organization sourced heat from the chemical industry, and less than 5% of its energy is from fossil fuels.

Ntombifuthi Zamathomaya Maluleka, City of Durban, said that it takes dedicated officials to recognize a problem and drive it into action, and noted her city’s climate and air solutions were born out of smart and innovative planning and development.

Helena Molin Valdes, Head of the CCAC Secretariat, moderated the concluding discussion, where panelists and audience members engaged on the best way to move the SLCP agenda forward within COPs, including by questioning how to measure them, proposing new metrics and describing lessons learned. Ricardo Lara, State Senator for California, joined the panel and noted that SLCPs need to be elevated to a global discussion and to the human level to ensure that they are not ignored.

L–R: Sameer Maithel, Director, Greentech Knowledge Solutions; Marcelo Mena Carrasco, Minister of Environment, Chile; Gustaf Wiklund, Öresundskraft Kraft & Varme AB; Ntombifuthi Zamathomaya Maluleka, City of Durban; Nic Lutsey, ICCT; Hassan Tampuli, CEO, National Petroleum Authority of Ghana; and Ricardo Lara, State Senator for California

Dan McDougall, CCAC Secretariat, said that reducing dangerous air pollutants is key to improving air quality.

Tiy Chung, CCAC Secretariat, introduced the Climate and Clean Air Awards ceremony.

Manuel Pulgar-Vidal, WWF, noted the relationship between climate, clean air and health.

Youba Sokona, Vice-Chair, IPCC, presented the Outstanding Policy Awards.


An audience member documents a photo-op.

Öresundskraft Kraft & Varme AB, put together a video on their experience in District Cooling.

Mark Watts, Executive Director, C40 Cities, highlighted the importance of innovative technologies in mitigating SLCPs.

Helena Molin Valdes, Head of the CCAC Secretariat, said that the Secretariat would be back next year with new winners.

Audience members and panelists watch the Awards ceremony.


L-R: Sameer Maithel, Director, Greentech Knowledge Solutions, and Manuel Pulgar-Vidal, WWF

Marcelo Mena Carrasco, Minister of Environment, Chile, explained that “we want clean air and we believe in climate hope.”


Nic Lutsey, ICCT, noted that “with a strategic project, no matter how small, you can change the world.”

Gustaf Wiklund, Öresundskraft Kraft & Varme AB, said that he was “truly honored” to be given the People’s Choice Award.

Ntombifuthi Zamathomaya Maluleka, City of Durban, said that it was “not easy to implement such a costly project, but we are already taking account of lessons learned.”

Representatives from the National Petroleum Authority of Ghana with IPCC Vice-Chair Youba Sokona

L-R: Ricardo Lara, State Senator for California; Edmund Gerald Brown Jr, Governor of California; and Youba Sokona, Vice-Chair, IPCC



 

Contact:
More Information:

Implementing Paris and the SDGs through Fossil Fuel Subsidy Reform and Taxation: Country Best PracticesPresented by the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD), Finland, Denmark, Climate Parliament and University of Eastern Finland



In this session, participants discussed practical country and international efforts to remove fossil fuel subsidies and invest in renewables, public transport and energy efficiency. Peter Wooders, IISD, moderated the panel. Welcoming participants, he said more than US$425 billion is spent each year on fossil fuel subsidies, both on the production and consumption side, and introduced the idea of clean energy subsidy swaps.

In opening remarks, Kimmo Tiilikainen, Minister for Housing, Energy and the Environment, Finland, noting that fossil fuel subsidy reform is an important cross-cutting issue, reported on actions undertaken to address it by his country, including: a tax on carbon emissions; legislation to be proposed to phase out coal in energy production by 2030; electric vehicle purchase subsidies; and a 30% target for renewable content in all fuel sold. He urged coherence across sectors, including regarding climate and trade policy.

Eva Svedling, State Secretary for Climate, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Sweden, in a keynote, reported on her country’s policies, including: a new climate policy framework with a goal of net zero emissions by 2045; and a carbon tax in place since 1991, which has led to emission reductions of 25% under 1990 levels. Noting that removing fossil fuel subsidies “cold turkey” is challenging, he emphasized that a carbon tax can be implemented step-by-step to ensure a smooth transition without jeopardizing energy security or support for the poorest.

Edgar Gutiérrez-Espeleta, Minister of Environment and Energy, Costa Rica, urged a long-term perspective to considering climate change within the context of the SDGs. He called for an end to political “short-termism” and neoliberal thinking. He also reported that his country is constructing a long-term low emission and resilience development strategy. He added that carbon pricing policies are expanding to include an annual levy on emissions from vehicles and industrial boiler. He concluded by noting the need to improve measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) systems to facilitate carbon pricing implementation.

Monica Araya, Founder, Costa Rica Limpia, highlighted the importance of connecting climate policy processes with “the people.” She said that to win over citizens, a combination of education, inspiration and empowerment is required. Reporting on the work of her organization, she described education efforts and policy reports. She urged being able to speak in fiscal language in order to win over finance policymakers, describing the importance of combating myths with evidence-led arguments.

Thorsten Herdan, Germany, explaining the economic rationale behind carbon pricing, said that without a worldwide price on carbon the Paris Agreement goals will never be achieved. He emphasized the importance of making people part of the clean energy transition and providing alternative livelihoods, saying that “any other approach will not work.” He described developments in German renewable energy subsidies and urged creating a market where “the price tells the truth.”

During the ensuing discussion, participants addressed questions on, among other things: dealing with the disproportionate effects to low-income communities of rising energy costs; how to reform fossil fuel subsidies in Australia; and combatting indirect subsidies.

Aupito Wiliam Sio, Minister for Pacific Peoples, New Zealand, in closing remarks, said his country is “determined to do the right thing” including by becoming carbon neutral by 2050, establishing a climate commission and supporting fossil fuel subsidy reform. He explained that New Zealand is located in the Pacific, where some countries are fighting for their survival. Reporting on efforts to reform fossil fuel subsidies in the World Trade Organization (WTO), he welcomed a French initiative to discuss this issue at the EU level, and invited participants to a side event to be held at the WTO Ministerial Conference in December 2017.


L-R: Kimmo Tiilikainen, Minister for Housing, Energy and the Environment, Finland; Peter Wooders, IISD; Edgar Gutiérrez-Espeleta, Minister of Environment and Energy, Costa Rica; Monica Araya, Founder, Costa Rica Limpia; and Thorsten Herdan, Germany

Kimmo Tiilikainen, Minister for Housing, Energy and the Environment, Finland, said that action on fossil fuel subsidy reform in all sectors is needed to achieve the SDGs and the Paris Agreement goals.

Eva Svedling, State Secretary for Climate, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Sweden, said subsidies free up resources to invest in sustainable development, health, education and social welfare.

Monica Araya, Founder, Costa Rica Limpia, said “because we are a small country, we have to think big,” describing their vision for a fossil free country.

Edgar Gutiérrez-Espeleta, Minister of Environment and Energy, Costa Rica, said that to date his country’s fuel tax has financed the reforestation of more than 728,000 hectares.

L-R: Peter Wooders, IISD; Edgar Gutiérrez-Espeleta, Minister of Environment and Energy, Costa Rica; Monica Araya, Founder, Costa Rica Limpia; and Thorsten Herdan, Germany

Peter Wooders, IISD, said fossil fuel subsidy reform is a country-driven opportunity to generate fiscal space so countries can spend what they want.

Thorsten Herdan, Germany, said “we need to take the people with us” in phasing out coal.

Contact:
More Information:

Early Lessons from GEF Integrated Approach Pilots (IAPs): Increasing Impact in GEF-7Presented by the Global Environment Facility (GEF)



In this event, moderated by Gustavo Fonseca, GEF, participants considered the scale of global environmental challenges, addressing the importance of supporting broad coalitions of committed stakeholders and innovative and scalable activities. Discussions showcased progress for the IAPs and how early lessons learned from the GEF-6 replenishment could be used to enhance programmes in the GEF-7 replenishment for the period 1 July 2018 through 30 June 2022.

David Rodgers, GEF, welcomed participants and introduced the discussion.

In opening remarks, Naoko Ishii, CEO and Chairperson, GEF, explained the IAPs, a new program for GEF-6 from 2014-2018, addressing key drivers of environmental degradation and focusing on key lessons to integrate all environmental spheres related to the GEF. She added that IAPs are relevant for sharing knowledge on the most successful projects, which will inform the GEF-7 replenishment process. She stressed three areas for moving IAPs forward: silos must be avoided; IAPs should be country-driven; and best practices on private sector participation must be integrated into the GEF work programme.

Fenrec Toth, Scientific and Technical Advisory Panel (STAP), GEF, spoke on the science of integrated approaches, noting the interlinkages between multiple environmental challenges, such as biodiversity and land degradation, as well as climate change. He emphasized institutional fragmentation as a major barrier for integrated solutions, and recommended systems thinking as the most appropriate method to maximize multiple benefits related to GEF projects. He added that this method identifies not only scientific issues but also tackles drivers of environmental degradation through a social science lens. He said that the theory of change could be implemented if a robust participatory method is conducted, and called for the use of common indicators when comparing project outcomes.

Fonseca invited panelists to consider the IAP Progress Report, stressing the need to address the root causes of environmental degradation instead of its effects. He highlighted the need to include the private sector as part of the solution in order to deliver solutions at the scale of current environmental threats.

Agnes Yobterik, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources, Kenya, discussed an IAP on fostering sustainability and resilience for food security in Sub-Saharan Africa. She explained that the IAP became attractive to her country as it speaks to Kenya’s aspirations on sustainable conservation, which seeks greater community participation. Kenya’s Vision 2030, she explained, focuses on a cleaner and safer environment for people and explored a pilot programme targeting water funds in coastal areas, relevant due to its payments for ecosystem services benefiting local communities and preserving watersheds. She explained that the two main objectives of the programme were to ensure the project’s sustainability and means to institutionalize these water funds, as well as to develop national capacity to continue to monitor the benefits of this programme.

Mariline Diara, Ministry of Environment and the Sustainable Development, Senegal, discussed sustainable cities, stressing food security, traffic, energy security, and implementation of projects in selected cities in Senegal. She highlighted cooperation with the World Bank in the north of her country to address coastal erosion and recommended focusing on resilience building in coastal zones as a “matter of survival.”

During the debate, participants raised questions on, inter alia: how to include health dimensions in announced pilots; how to deal with commodities and the private sector; and future projects and criteria to engage with IAPs related to cities. One health, one panelist responded noting the problems with malaria and confirmed that this disease is increasingly perceived as related to climate change due to the increase in temperatures and breeding areas for water-borne diseases.

In closing, Fonseca spoke on next steps towards GEF-7, noting the need to increase projects’ impacts, largely by scaling up private sector engagement with the fund and highlighted efforts to address health themes within the GEF, such as through the elimination of persistent organic pollutants. 

Ferenc Toth, STAP, GEF, noted the importance of systems thinking to deal with complexities linked to environmental projects.

David Rodgers, GEF, welcomed participants.

Gustavo Fonseca, GEF, emphasized the need to scale up private sector engagement within the Fund.

Mariline Diara, Ministry of Environment and the Sustainable Development, Senegal, noted the importance of protecting coastal areas for livelihoods in Senegal.

 

Agnes Yobterik, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources, Kenya, said “we need to share lessons” to improve developing countries’ experiences with the GEF.

Naoko Ishii, CEO and Chairperson, GEF, declared the need for collective thinking to maximize co-benefits of sustainability.

 

 


Contact:
More Information:

Filling the Void: US State-Driven Climate LeadershipPresented by the US Climate Alliance


In this side event, governors from the US discussed their commitments on clean energy, pollution control and emission reductions. Christiana Figueres, Mission 2020, moderated the panel.

Kate Brown, Governor of Oregon, US, noted concerns that climate impacts will exacerbate already existing economic disparities in low-income communities, communities of color, tribal communities and rural communities in her state. She outlined measures her state government has taken on water, fire prevention and transportation. Describing the development of a carbon pricing strategy, she stressed the importance of collaborating with these communities and “bringing them to the table” to achieve prosperity for all.

Terry McAuliffe, Governor of Virginia, US, noting that recent electoral successes in his state affirmed clean environment policies, outlined his use of executive orders to implement climate policies including offshore wind, energy efficiency and solar energy. He stressed the need to “lean in” using executive action and strategies for electoral change. He called for US citizens to “come out and vote” in the US midterm elections in order to “get control of Congress” for federal action on climate.

Jay Inslee, Governor of Washington, noting that his state is renowned for innovation, creativity and invention, said climate change is “the largest economic opportunity since the invention of the steam engine” and that states and companies, which invent green technologies, will be “the greatest wealth creators since the Medicis.” Outlining key innovations made in his state, he highlighted clean energy’s potential for job creation.

Arnold Schwarzenegger, former Governor of California, stressed that climate change needs to be communicated as a health issue, saying that “we need to talk about smog, pollution, death and illnesses” when arguing for the need to address the climate threat. He noted that emphasizing climate change as a health issue has a greater chance to trigger action than the intangible “sea-level rise” message. He also focused on the need to forge cross-party coalitions, saying that “we all breathe the same air – there is no Republican air and Democrat air.” He called for a shift in climate communication towards planetary health, job creation, national security and pollution.

Jerry Brown, Governor of California, highlighted the Global Climate Action Summit to be held in September 2018, which will bring together subnational actors including cities, states and corporations to discuss their climate commitments and action plans. He noted the legacies of former governors, saying that California’s vehicle-emissions rules came about as the result of a team effort.

During discussions, Figueres posed questions on the role of US subnational actors in engaging with federal government and the necessity of strong political signals from the US in order to move the climate negotiations forward. In response, Inslee stressed that the US Climate Alliance is in Bonn “to make the world aware that Donald Trump cannot stop us,” highlighting that state governments are already taking action on the ground. He underscored that if the US Climate Alliance, which is committed to the Paris Agreement, was a separate nation it would constitute the third largest economy in the world. Brown noted that “all of us working together” can have a much greater impact than working alone. He said that even if the US is temporarily on the sidelines, “that doesn’t mean we should stop and let the world go to hell,” calling on all other countries to “carry the ball.” Schwarzenegger stressed the “tremendous power” of local governments, calling for states and local governments to have a seat at the table in UN decision-making processes.

In closing remarks, Figueres characterized the Paris Agreement as a unidirectional highway leading everyone to a decarbonized global economy by 2050, and said that “even if one vehicle is parked on the sidelines other vehicles should keep their eyes on their own lane.”



Kate Brown, Governor of Oregon, said that climate change legislation needs to help reduce disparities and make sure that communities can thrive “regardless of zip code, skin color and immigration status.”

Jerry Brown, Governor of California, called on national and local governments to “do as much as you can, wherever you are.”

Jay Inslee, Governor of Washington, said state governments are not subnationals but “supernationals” because “we are going to lead the US away from climate denial and to a new industrial revolution of jobs.”

Arnold Schwarzenegger, former Governor of California, said “we should not rely on national governments” because “the greatest movements started with people from the grassroots up.”

Terry McAuliffe, Governor of Virginia, said there is a new “blue wall” on the East Coast of the United States “and that is the Commonwealth of Virginia.”

Christiana Figueres, Mission 2020, asked the panelists about bottom-up actions in their states.

Jay Inslee, Governor of Washington

Jerry Brown, Governor of California, and Arnold Schwarzenegger, former Governor of California

L-R: Terry McAuliffe, Governor of Virginia; Christiana Figueres, Mission 2020; Kate Brown, Governor of Oregon; and Jay Inslee, Governor of Washington

Contact:
More Information:

SDG11: Women Leaders on Making Human Settlements Inclusive, Sustainable and ResilientPresented by C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group

Moderated by Laurence Tubiana, European Climate Foundation (ECF), this high-level side event discussed gender issues and inclusiveness as key variables for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and implementing the Paris Agreement.

Hilda Heine, President, the Marshall Islands, spoke on the necessity of education, emphasizing decentralized cooperative modes of leadership, such as group learning activities in her country, to empower women and climate champions.

In a keynote speech, Katrin Stjernfeldt Jammeh, Mayor of Malmö, Sweden, emphasized the need to include cities in decision making and declared her city’s commitment to implement the SDGs, saying that “climate change is about the faith of humanity.”

Mary Robinson, President, Mary Robinson Foundation, said the event is a great start for the Marrakech Partnership for Global Climate Action, launched by the High-Level Champions at COP 22. She underscored the vitality of bottom-up approaches, which can take into account the “real needs” of vulnerable populations.

In a second panel discussion, Aisa Kirabo Kacyira, Deputy Executive Director of UN-Habitat, moderated the session and praised the panel’s emphasis on gender inclusiveness and human settlements.

Célestine Ketcha Courtès, Mayor of Bangangté, Cameroon, recalling low numbers of women in positions of power in Africa, highlighted that women suffer the most without reliable energy in many poor areas.

Helen Fernández, Mayor of Caracas, Venezuela, emphasized the value of democracy as a key ingredient for sustainability and noted the challenges of single parenting in her country which she said affects a significant proportion of women.

Montserrat Mir Roca, European Trade Union Confederation (ETUC), highlighting the need for equal pay between men and women, explained her organization’s commitment to 50/50 gender equality in internal jobs, which is followed up by legally binding rules.

Naoko Ishii, CEO and Chairperson, GEF, describes GEF support to cities, noting the need for holistic urban planning, multi-stakeholder engagement, and city-to-city learning platforms.

Kate Brown, Governor of Oregon, US, emphasized moral and economic imperatives to overcome gender gaps and described efforts in her state to expand clean energy, which can bring new jobs and training opportunities for the most vulnerable.

Ingrid-Gabriela Hoven, Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), Germany, declared that the future of the Paris Agreement will be played out in cities and emphasized the need to localize the SDGs and enhance spatial planning according to sustainable principles.

Maria Helena Langa, Mayor of Mandlakazi, Mozambique, highlighted lack of knowledge about accessing funding as the major obstacle to making cities more resilient. She suggested capacity building and institutional coordination as means to improve the distribution of finance.

Barbara Kreissler, Philips Lighting, underscored energy efficiency as the most effective way to accelerate energy solutions and save resources, which could be invested in other areas such as infrastructure and education.

In closing, Tubiana commended the energy of all the panelists on the “100% women panel” and their leadership.

Women unite to promote climate resilient cities.

Maria Helena Langa, Mayor of Mandlakazi, Mozambique, noted knowledge gaps to access funds at the city level.

Laurence Tubiana, ECF, praised the energy of the "100% women panel."


Hilda Heine, President, the Marshall Islands, called for enhanced learning opportunities for women.

Katrin Stjernfeldt Jammeh, Mayor of Malmö, Sweden, recalled that "green economy is also profitable."

Helen Fernández, Mayor of Caracas, Venezuela, declared that "power ambitions" in Venezuela are detrimental to her country and called for a democratic movement to regain force.

Célestine Ketcha Courtes, Mayor of Bangangté, Cameroon, emphasized the dangers of power shortages for women's safety in Africa.

Mary Robinson, President, Mary Robinson Foundation, said "after all, development is about people."

Naoko Ishii, CEO and Chairperson, the GEF, said "cities are at the forefront of our work."

L-R: Maria Helena Langa, Mayor of Mandlakazi, Mozambique; Kate Brown, Governor of the State of Oregon, US; Ingrid Gabriela Hoven; and Barbara Kreissler, Philips Lighting


Contact:
More Information:

Catalyzing Implementation of the Paris Agreement through the Regional Collaboration Centres Presented by the Secretariat of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)

This session presented strategic institutional partnerships and on-the-ground regional initiatives by the UNFCCC and its partners in the Regional Collaboration Centres (RCCs) in Bangkok, Kampala, Lomé, Panama and St. George’s. The session also included the signing of a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES).

James Grabert, UNFCCC Secretariat, emphasized that in the context of a changing environment that is increasingly facing the threats of climate change, national and regional institutions must coordinate and enhance local cooperation on climate resilience.

Isabelle Melançon, Minister of Sustainable Development, Environment and the Fight Against Climate Change, Government of Quebec, announced contributions pledged by her government, among several others, to build capacity for francophone governments to implement their Paris commitments. She said her government is proud to participate and to create a carbon price in the global economy, thereby contributing to fighting climate change.

Kazuhiko Takeuchi, President, IGES, recalling the establishment of the first RCC in 2015, elaborated on the in-country training, and regional dialogues on Paris Agreement Article 6 (cooperative approaches) and the market mechanisms in the Paris Agreement. He pledged further support, particularly with implementing Nationally Determined Contributions through enhancing the capacity to track them.

Ovais Sarmad, UNFCCC Deputy Executive Secretary, emphasized of translating the policies and mandates from the Secretariat into implementable practices.

L-R: Ovais Sarmad, UNFCCC Deputy Executive Secretary; James Grabert, UNFCCC Secretariat; Isabelle Melançon, Minister of Sustainable Development, Environment and the Fight Against Climate Change, Government of Quebec; and Kazuhiko Takeuchi, President, IGES



Ovais Sarmad, UNFCCC Deputy Executive Secretary, said it is critical to “turn the work from the conference rooms into practice.”

James Grabert, UNFCCC Secretariat, applauded the work of the RCCs in building capacity within countries.

Isabelle Melançon, Minister of Sustainable Development, Environment and the Fight Against Climate Change, Government of Quebec, shared on progress made in implementing REDD+ actions in the forestry sector.

Kazuhiko Takeuchi, President, IGES, stressed the importance of partnerships to accelerate REDD+ implementation.

Ovais Sarmad, UNFCCC Deputy Executive Secretary, and Kazuhiko Takeuchi, President, IGES, signed an MoU to signal continued cooperation on RCCs.

 

 


Contact:
More Information:


IISD Reporting Services is grateful to the many donors of the Earth Negotiations Bulletin (ENB) and recognizes the following as core contributors to the ENB: the European Union and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. General Support for the Bulletin during 2017 is provided by the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety (BMUB), Italian Ministry for the Environment, Land and Sea, Japanese Ministry of Environment (through the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies - IGES), New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Swedish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Government of Switzerland (Swiss Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN)), and SWAN International. Funding for translation of the Bulletin into French has been provided by the Government of France, Québec, and the Institute of La Francophonie for Sustainable Development (IFDD), a subsidiary body of the International Organization of La Francophonie (OIF).