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Coverage of Selected Side Events at the Climate Change Conference - December 2019

2-13 December 2019 | Madrid, Spain

Adaptation Actions with Mitigation Co-Benefits and Economic Diversifications

Presented by Qatar’s Ministry of Municipality and Environment (MME)
Participants during the event

This event took place to discuss adaptation-related and economic diversification actions that have benefits for mitigation. This concept laid out in the Paris Agreement includes building the resilience of socioeconomic and ecological systems in adaptation planning processes. Speakers discussed the lack of focus on adaptation in the past, with some discussion also considering the lack of consensus regarding modalities and procedures for assessment of adaptation.

Mohammed Almarzooqi, Qatar Civil Aviation Authority, moderated the event. Mohsin AlShaikh, Hamad International Airports (HIA), reported on the energy, water and waste working groups of HIA that support reductions of carbon, while improving energy efficiency. He drew attention to the Energy Savings and Performance Award launched to recognize stakeholders and contractors who continue to implement energy-saving strategies in their various fields of operations at HIA. The Award, he reported, goes to recipients representing the best energy conservation project, best contractor for energy savings, and best stakeholder for energy savings. Reporting on further achievements, he highlighted the: reduction of 1.55% of energy consumption with cost savings of QAR 2.9 million; replacement of 16,085 LED lights in the terminal area with reduced emissions of 1936 tons of carbon per year. He also highlighted the Energy Savings Awareness Initiative targeted at HIA staff members to conserve electricity. He further reported on the “One Degree Makes a Difference” campaign, where HIA increased the air conditioning temperature by one degree during the 2018 winter period, saving more than 2,000 MWH with carbon reduction of approximate 1,000 tons.

Axel Michaelowa, Founder, Perspective Climate Group, presented methodologies for assessing mitigation co-benefits of adaptation actions (MCBA). Noting that the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) is a useful starting point for the development of these methodologies, he outlined MCBA steps including defining activity boundaries, which can be direct emissions of plants, further highlighting indirect emissions from plant construction or emissions from all project activities. He also discussed ways of calculating baselines, which consists of emissions if the absence of the project activity, and monitoring the performance of emissions from the plant.

Gareth Phillips, Manager, Climate Change and Environment Finance Division, African Development Bank (AfDB), noted investments for mitigation have gained more traction than for adaptations. This is said is due to the lack of bankable business models for the latter, and thus no incentive for private sector involvement. He presented AfDB’s Adaptation Benefit Mechanism (ABM), which is a mechanism for mobilizing new and additional public and private sector funding for climate adaptation. He explained that ABM certifies the social, economic and environmental benefits of adaptation actions, which are promoted to potential investors or lenders for private partnerships.

Abdulrahim Al Muftah, Qatar Supreme Committee for Delivery and Legacy, discussed the hosting concept for the FIFA 2022 World Cup, highlighting the proposed sustainability and carbon neutrality measures. He reported that the Khalifa and Al Janoub stadiums have already received 4-Star Global Sustainability Assessment System (GSAS) ratings. He noted that the carbon-neutrality of the World Cup preparations and operations is supported by the Global Carbon Trust (GCT) to develop assessment standards to measure carbon reduction, implement carbon reduction projects and issue carbon credits which offset emissions. He reported on a climate change risk assessment during the design stages of the hosting concept that tracks temperature, humidity and sea level rise, and mitigation measures required, which include: tree nurseries; district cooling plants; onsite sewage treatment; and metro transport, among others.

Baligh Awad Al Saddi, MME, presented activities of the ministry to implementing the first NDC report, in collaboration with the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI), which included sections on the Qatari climate situation, and adaptation actions with mitigation co-benefits. He reported on the development of a Measurement, Reporting, and Verification (MRV) system to report and track climate actions, and on the ministry’s Green Growth Strategy.

In ensuing discussions, participants noted the need to include impacts of climate change including disaster management in mitigation and adaptation planning; the role of insurance for adaptation in developing countries; and the need to ensure projects consider sustainability through green initiatives prior to implementation. The Qatari Supreme Committee for Delivery and Legacy also clarified that after the FIFA 2022 World Cup, 50% of materials from all stadiums would be transferred to African Countries in an effort to encourage them to develop sports facilities.

During the closing, Abdulhadi Nasser Almarri, Director Climate Change Department, MEE, presented speakers with certificates of appreciation.

Moderator Mohammed Almarzooqi, Qatar Civil Aviation Authority, introduced the event with a video about Qatar's involvement in the climate change negotiations.
Axel Michaelowa, Founder, Perspective Climate Group
Mohsin AlShaikh, HIA
Participants during Mohsin AlShaikh’s presentation
Gareth Phillips, Manager, Climate Change and Environment Finance Division, AfDB
Abdulrahim Al Muftah, Qatar Supreme Committee for Delivery and Legacy
Baligh Awad Al Saddi, MME
Abdulhadi Nasser Almarri, Director Climate Change Department, MEE, and Mohsin AlShaikh, HIA
Abdulhadi Nasser Almarri, Director Climate Change Department, MEE, and Axel Michaelowa, Founder, Perspective Climate Group
Abdulhadi Nasser Almarri, Director Climate Change Department, MEE, and Abdulrahim Al Muftah, Qatar Supreme Committee for Delivery and Legacy
Abdulhadi Nasser Almarri, Director Climate Change Department, MEE, and Gareth Phillips, Manager, Climate Change and Environment Finance Division, AfDB)
Abdulhadi Nasser Almarri, Director Climate Change Department, MEE, and Baligh Awad Al Saddi, MME

CONTACT

Baligh Awad Al Saddi, MME | badakdakay@mme.gov.qa

MORE INFORMATION

www.mme.gov.qa


Decarbonizing Transport: Promoting E-Mobility in Developing Countries

Presented by the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the International Energy Agency (IEA), and the UN Environment Programme (UNEP)
Posted by IISD Reporting Services on Monday, 9 December 2018

This event showcased the GEF Global E-Mobility Programme, in partnership with the IEA and UNEP, which is supporting an initial set of 17 developing countries to develop conducive policy and regulatory environments, ensure effective technology transfer, and facilitate private sector engagement and access to commercial finance for the introduction of e-vehicle fleets.

Gustavo Fonseca, Director of Programs, GEF, moderated the first panel, noting that the transport sector accounts for 25% of global emissions, and stressing the importance of a shift to more efficient modes of transport, and an improvement of transportation systems through the introduction of zero-emissions vehicles.

In his keynote address, José Luis Domínguez, Deputy Minister, Ministry of Transportation and Communications, Chile, welcomed the seventh GEF replenishment (GEF-7) and the e-mobility programme, noting that disruptive technologies provide an opportunity to address carbon emissions as well as reduce vehicular congestion in urban spaces. He reported that there are over 400 electric buses on the road since the country rolled out its e-mobility plan, calling for further private sector investment in this sector.

Luca Lo Re, IEA, presented on the current state of play of the e-mobility market. He reminded participants that the global energy-related carbon emissions have been on the rise over the last two years, stating that inaction will result in a further significant increase in these emissions, a scenario that is incompatible with the achievement of the goals of the Paris Agreement. He drew attention to the importance of private and publicly accessible charging infrastructure to power e-mobility, and discussed the need for larger battery capacities in e-vehicles.

Mark Radka, Chief, Energy. Climate and Technology Branch, UNEP, underscored the urgency of moving to low- and no-emission mobility globally in order to address carbon emissions, calling on governments in developing countries in particular to implement policies that prohibit the import of low-quality high-emission vehicles. Noting that the world has underestimated the growth and thus the opportunities presented by e-mobility, he called for a greater focus on city design, to enable e-mobility technologies to operate, and improving efficiency of internal combustion vehicles until such a time as e-mobility can be fully mobilized.

Oliver Lah, Wuppertal Institute and EC Solution+, presented on the EC Solutions+ electric mobility project, which begins in 2020, working with partners in demonstration projects on e-mobility in several cities around the world. He noted that e-mobility could save trillions of dollars, noting that a decarbonized future with sufficient investments into e-mobility could save USD 6 trillion a year.

Filippo Berardi, Coordinator of Climate Mitigation, GEF, moderated the second panel. Joana Costa, Antigua and Barbuda, stressed that bus-driver buy-in is essential for the transition to electric buses, and noted the opportunities for driver training during the the e-mobility demonstration project in her country. She noted that increasing the ridership and decreasing the driver costs by installing solar panels facilitates driver buy-in, and highlighted the importance of awareness to promote demand in e-vehicles.

Jogeeswar Seewoobadut, Ministry of Environment, Solid Waste Management and Climate Change, Mauritius, highlighted that e-mobility is one of the decarbonization strategies for the transport sector addressed in the country’s nationally determined contribution (NDC). He described further efforts to rollout a public electric bus system through incorporating 30 electric feeder-buses into the existing bus fleet. He reported that the country’s bus modernization programme is not delivering as expected, further discussing the current lack of capacity, finance, awareness, and infrastructure as barriers to establishing a fully electric bus transit system.

Stressing the importance of e-mobility to address both the climate and air quality crises, Sheila Watson, Deputy Director, FIA Foundation, described her organization role in supporting safe and sustainable mobility, as well as exposing the threats posed by over-emitting vehicles. She underlined that the addition of transport electrification to all other current decarbonization actions are still not sufficient to meet the Paris Agreement goals. She underscored the “desperate need” for shared mobility and alternate modes of transport, urging stakeholders not to replace the “love affair with carbon-intensive Sports Utility Vehicles with a love affair with e-vehicles.”

Sergio Fernández Balaguer, Coordinator, Research and Innovation Projects Department, Madrid, noted the importance of the “think global, act local” approach to decarbonize the public transport sector. He noted that Madrid has the largest bus fleet in Spain that runs on compressed natural gas, which has helped to improve air quality in the city. He also pointed to an increase in electric buses, and highlighted that the city is trying to improve its charging system to cater to over 650 electric buses by 2027.

José Luis Domínguez, Deputy Minister, Ministry of Transportation and Communications, Chile
Moderator Gustavo Fonseca, Director of Programs, GEF
Participants during the first panel of the event
Oliver Lah, Wuppertal Institute and EC Solution+
Mark Radka, Chief, Energy, Climate and Technology Branch, UNEP
Participants listen to panelists
Luca Lo Re, IEA
A view of the audience from the dais perspective.
L-R: Filippo Berardi, Coordinator of Climate Mitigation, GEF; Jogeeswar Seewoobaduth, Ministry of Environment, Solid Waste Management and Climate Change, Mauritius; Joana Costa, Antigua and Barbuda; Sergio Fernández Balaguer, Coordinator, Research and Innovation Projects Department, Madrid; and Sheila Watson, Deputy Director, FIA Foundation
Joana Costa, Antigua and Barbuda
Jogeeswar Seewoobaduth, Ministry of Environment, Solid Waste Management and Climate Change, Mauritius
Moderator Filippo Berardi, Coordinator of Climate Mitigation, GEF
Jogeeswar Seewoobaduth, Ministry of Environment, Solid Waste Management and Climate Change, Mauritius
Yi-Chieh Chan, Delta Electronics Foundation
Sheila Watson, Deputy Director, FIA Foundation
Group photo at the end of the event

GCF Green Champions Awards

Presented by the Green Climate Fund (GCF)
A view of the GCF Green Champions Award

At this event, the winners of the first ever GCF Green Champion Awards were presented. The Award recognizes and promotes the most noteworthy and successful efforts and initiatives to combat climate change, through concerted environmental, social and business-led commitments.

Darren Karjama, GCF, moderated this event, noting that the Fund also assists countries to replicate successful climate action. Noting that hundreds of nominations were received, he acknowledged the work of a high-level panel of jurors who eventually chose the winners of these first GCF Green Champions Awards.

Quoting UN Secretary-General Antonio Gutteres, Javier Manzanares, Deputy Executive Director, GCF, stressed that if we want change, we must be that change, and noted that the size of the climate emergency can be overwhelming. Underlining that the Green Champion Award is meant to inspire hope, he reiterated that only by working together can the world overcome the climate crisis.

Participants then watched a brief video introducing the Award jurors who include Claudia Martínez Zuleta, Director, E3-Ecology, Economics and Ethics; Inderpreet Singh Wadhwa, Chairman and CEO, Azure Power Global Limited; MaryJane Enchill, Deputy CEO, HATOF Foundation; Patricia Espinosa, Executive Secretary, UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC); Ricardo Lagos, former President of Chile; Youba Sokona, Vice-Chair, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC); Claudia Dobles Camargo, First Lady of Cost Rica; Anne Hidalgo, Mayor of Paris; and Lorna Regina Bautista Legarda, Deputy House Speaker of the House of Representatives, the Philippines.

Enchill presented the Climate Youth Champion award, to Elizabeth Wanjiru Wathuti, Founder, Green Generation Initiative, for her work towards engaging youth in global environmental challenges. Accepting the award, Wathuti stressed that young people need to be included in all activities that will shape their future, pointing to the vision of a green world defined by the late Nobel Laureate Wangari Maathai. She highlighted her work with 2000 school children in Kenya focusing on greening schools, nurturing children, planting fruit trees to ensure food security, and promoting a tree-planting culture. Calling for urgent action on the two existential threats facing the world through the climate crisis and the ecological crisis, she stressed the need to also consider the needs of children in climate action.

Sokona presented the Climate Entrepreneur Champion to Muhammed Lubowa, Uganda, whose company, All In Trade Limited, deals with the provision and maintenance of reliable and affordable renewable energy systems in East Africa. Acknowledging the efforts of his team, Lubowa shared that the company focuses on maintaining high quality back-up systems powered using renewable sources of energy. He said that the company is a regional powerhouse, and expressed gratitude to his company's development partners and clients for their support.

Legarda presented the Transformational Country Champion award to Wills Agricole, Ministry of Environment, Seychelles. Accepting the award, Agricole expressed pride in the country’s climate action thus far. Stating that the award recognizes dedication towards climate action from a small island developing state, he stressed that it stands as a pillar of his life’s work, sharing that he would like to be remembered for contributing to climate solutions during a crisis period. Stressing the unique role of the Seychelles in providing climate solutions, he committed to pushing for a robust outcome at COP25 for climate action.

Legarda also presented the Climate Gender Champion award to Trupti Jain, India, who established the Women Climate Leaders programme. Accepting the award, Jain thanked her family and friends and dedicated her award to the 100,000 smallholder women farmers in the developing world who have benefitted from technical and financial skills offered by her organization. She noted that innovative pumps from her initiative provide stored water during the dry seasons, stressing that has helped decrease suicide rates among farmers during droughts. She said that as the technology is scaled up, and it is transforming women from being smallholder farmers to becoming climate champions.

Daniele Violetti, UNFCCC, for Executive Secretary Patricia Espinosa, presented the Climate Community Champion award to the Argentina Network of Municipalities facing Climate Change (RAMCC). Accepting the award on behalf of their organization, Ricardo Bertolino and Emanuel Ayala thanked the GCF as well as their local support network. Noting that cities are at the frontlines of the fight against climate change, Ayala highlighted that cities in Argentina have committed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 45% by 2030.

Violetti also presented the Climate Lifetime Achievement Champion award to Francisco Gordillo, Ecuador, who works to address river pollution through the creation of water funds across the country. Gordillo thanked the GCF, as well as the local politicians, describing his belief in the importance of sharing experiences in order to better confront the challenges facing society today.

Moderator Darren Karjama, the GCF
Javier Manzanares, Deputy Executive Director, the GCF
Participants congratulate the award recipients.
MaryJane Enchill, Deputy CEO, HATOF Foundation, and Elizabeth Wanjiru Wathuti, Founder, Green Generation Initiative
Muhammed Lubowa, Uganda, and Youba Sokona, IPCC Vice-Chair
Wills Agricole, Ministry of Environment, Seychelles, and Lorna Regina Bautista Legarda, Deputy House Speaker of the House of Representatives, the Philippines
Trupti Jain, India, and Lorna Regina Bautista Legarda, Deputy House Speaker of the House of Representatives, the Philippines
Emanuel Ayala and Ricardo Bertolino, RAMCC, and Daniele Violetti, UNFCCC
Francisco Gordillo, Ecuador, and Daniele Violetti, UNFCCC
Award recipients listen final remarks given by Darren Karjama, the GCF
Photo of award recipients and jurors at the end of the event
Participants enjoy beverages at the end of the event

CONTACT

Omnia Al-Mamoun, the GCF | oalmamoun@gcfund.org

MORE INFORMATION

https://awards.greenchampions.online/

Around the Venue
Alphonce Munyao, Olive Ntivuguruzwa, Allen Ottaro, and Lucia Mosongo, Catholic Youth Network for Environmental Sustainability in Africa (CYNESA)

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