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Workshop on Energy Efficiency Opportunities While Phasing-Down Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and 40th Meeting of the Open-Ended Working Group of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer

9-14 July 2018 | Vienna, Austria

Summary Highlights 9-14 July 2018

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From L-R: Taha Mohammed Zatari, Saudi Arabia; Hamoud Al-Otaibi, Saudi Arabia; and John Thompson, US

On Saturday, delegates to the Open-Ended Working Group to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (OEWG 40) finalized discussions on data reporting, unexpected emissions of trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11), Technology and Economic Assessment Panel (TEAP) senior expert nominations, energy efficiency, and adjustments to the Protocol.

OEWG 40 concluded all its agenda items until the thirtieth Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol on Substance that Deplete the Ozone Layer (MOP 30) and received submissions of three conference room papers (CRPs) that will be forwarded for consideration by MOP 30 convening in November in Quito, Ecuador. These relate to: unexpected emissions of CFC-11; access of Article 5 parties to energy-efficient technologies in the refrigeration, air-conditioning and heat-pump sectors; and addressing the composition and balance of the assessment panels.

Other highlights of the day included:

  • China reported on its immediate actions following reports of unexpected CFC-11 emissions from the East Asia region, including onsite inspections, sample collections, testing, and investigations of leads provided by the Environmental Investigation Agency.
  • OEWG 40 delegates highlighted discussions and suggestions on possible actions to be taken on CFC-11 prior to MOP 30, including by the Secretariat, the Scientific Assessment Panel and TEAP, parties, and institutions.

After adopting the report of the meeting and hearing closing statements, OEWG 40 closed at 10:40 pm.

IISD Reporting Services, through its Earth Negotiations Bulletin (ENB) Meeting Coverage, has providing daily digital coverage and a summary and analysis from OEWG 40.

Photos by IISD/ENB | Mike Muzurakis
For photo reprint permissions, please follow instructions at our Attribution Regulations for Meeting Photo Usage Page.

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Highlights for Saturday, 14 July 2018

From L-R: Gilbert Bankobeza, Ozone Secretariat; Ozone Secretariat Executive Secretary Tina Birmpili; OEWG 40 Co-Chair Cindy Newberg, US; OEWG 40 Co-Chair Yaqoub Al-Matouq, Kuwait; Megumi Seki, Ozone Secretariat; and Martha Leyva, Ozone Secretariat

Ozone Secretariat Executive Secretary Tina Birmpili, and OEWG 40 Co-Chair Cindy Newberg, US

OEWG 40 Co-Chair Yaqoub Al-Matouq, Kuwait, with Megumi Seki, Ozone Secretariat

Sergey Vasiliev, the Russian Federation

Salim Humaid Al Badi, Oman

Akil Hanafi Fodil, Algeria

OEWG 40 Co-Chair Yaqoub Al-Matouq, Kuwait

Basim Ghafil, and Raad Kadhum Hasan, Iraq

Delegates from the EU

Delegates from the EU and India conferring

Leslie Smith, Grenada, and Saad Aldeen AlNumairy, UAE

Ozone Secretariat Executive Secretary Tina Birmpili, with John Thompson, US

Highlights for Friday, 13 July 2018

OEWG 40 Co-Chair Yaqoub Al-Matouq, Kuwait, and Megumi Seki, Ozone Secretariat

Delegates to the fortieth meeting of the Open-Ended Working Group to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (OEWG 40) continued their deliberations on Friday, considering the following agenda items:

  • Global emissions of the ozone depleting substance trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11);
  • Data reporting issues under the Kigali Amendment;
  • Progress on future availability of halons and their alternatives;
  • Development and availability of laboratory and analytical procedures that can be performed without using controlled substances under the Protocol;
  • Process agents;
  • Organizational and other matters relating to the work of the Technology and Economic Assessment Panel (TEAP);
  • Senior expert nominations from parties to the TEAP;
  • Composition and balance of the TEAP;
  • Eligibility for financial and technical assistance; and
  • Proposed adjustments to the Montreal Protocol.

Informal consultations took place throughout the day, and several contact groups convened into the evening, where delegates discussed:

  • ways to address unexpected emissions of CFC-11;
  • destruction of technologies;
  • linkages between hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) in transitioning to low global warming potential alternatives; and
  • energy efficiency while phasing down HFCs.

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Tumau Herownna Neru, Samoa

Phillipa Guthrey, New Zealand

Laura Juliana Arciniegas, Colombia

Yawo Dandjesso, Togo

Megumi Seki, and Martha Leyva, Ozone Secretariat

OEWG 40 Co-Chairs Cindy Newberg, US, and Yaqoub Al-Matouq, Kuwait

Hamoud Al-Otaibi, and Taha Mohammed Zatari, Saudi Arabia

Samuel Pare, Burkina Faso, and Andrew Clark, US

Ian Porter, Technology and Economic Assessment Panel (TEAP)

Multilateral Fund delegates in discussions

Highlights for Thursday, 12 July 2018

Delegates from India during the lunch break

Delegates to the fortieth meeting of the Open-Ended Working Group to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (OEWG 40) continued their deliberations on Thursday, considering the following agenda items:

  • TEAP Report on energy efficiency in the refrigeration, air-conditioning and heat pump (RACHP) sectors as well as the key messages from the workshop on energy efficiency opportunities while phasing down HFCs;
  • Requirements for HCFCs for 2020 to 2030 for non-Article 5; and
  • Global Emissions of CFC-11.

Some of these discussions continued in informal consultations in the evening.

Two contact groups, tasked to reach agreement on details needed for the implementation of the Kigali Amendment, met throughout the day, focusing on clarifying data reporting issues and approving destruction technologies for HFCs. A third contact group, on linkages between HCFCs and HFCs in transitioning to low global warming potential (GWP) alternatives, met in the evening.

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View of the dais during the plenary session

Obed Baloyi, South Africa

Nora Al-Otaibi, Saudi Arabia

Wenfu Dong, China

Cheikh Ndiaye Sylla, Senegal

Samuel Pare, Burkina Faso

From L-R: Amna Kazim, UAE; Saad Aldeen AlNumairy, UAE; and Hassan Ali Mubarak, Bahrain

John Thompson, US, with Taha Mohammed Zatari, Saudi Arabia

Gerald Mutisya, Ozone Secretariat, and Cornelius Rhein, EU

Nadia Sohier Zaman, IISD, and Kevin Mead, Canada

Participants during the lunch break

Highlights for Wednesday, 11 July 2018

Ozone Secretariat Executive Secretary Tina Birmpili; OEWG 40 Co-Chair Cindy Newberg, US; and OEWG 40 Co-Chair Yaqoub Al-Matouq, Kuwait

The fortieth meeting of the Open-Ended Working Group to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (OEWG 40) opened Wednesday, 11 July 2018, in Vienna, Austria. In their opening remarks, Josef Plank, Ministry of Sustainability and Tourism, Austria, and Ozone Secretariat Executive Secretary Tina Birmpili cited recent findings of global emission increases of the ozone depleting substance trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11). They called on delegates to address the issue, with Executive Secretary Birmpili reminding: “We have an obligation to use the institutions of the regime that we have created - this is how the treaty works.“

Discussions during the day focused on sharing views on:

  • the Technology and Economic Assessment Panel (TEAP) Report 2018 Volumes 3 (Progress Report) and 4 (Evaluation of 2018 Critical Use Nominations for Methyl Bromide and Related Matters);
  • destruction technologies for controlled substances;
  • linkages between hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) in transitioning to low global warming potential (GWP) alternatives; and
  • outcomes of the workshop on energy efficiency opportunities while phasing down HFCs.

Highlights of the day included:

  • Plenary added three items to the agenda to address eligibility for technical and financial assistance, global emissions of CFC-11, and organization and composition of the TEAP.
  • Executive Secretary Birmpili said that any illegal consumption and production of CFC-11 would demand decisive action, “we must identify with accuracy the problem and rectify it.”
  • She also reminded delegates of interlinkages to 13 of the 17 SDGs to which "the ozone treaty" contributes, drawing attention to the High-level Political Forum (HLPF) 2018 convening concurrently in New York City.

Several parties expressed concern about the unexpected and persistent increase in CFC-11 emissions and welcomed that the meeting will provide early time to discuss this new agenda item. They referred to an Article published in the Journal Nature on 16 May 2018, that revealed CFC-11 emissions increased significantly despite the reported elimination of CFC-11 production under the Montreal Protocol. This suggests new unreported CFC-11 production, when the existence of any new CFC-11 production would violate the Protocol obligation to eliminate production of CFCs by 2010. An apparent inconsistency emerges because the production of CFC-11 for dispersive uses has been phased out globally under the Protocol and the production reported to the Ozone Secretariat since 2010 has been very small and for essential uses.

Besides alarming concern, the Report delivered by the COP and MOP presidents to the HLPF 2018 explained that these findings also highlight the efficacy of the Montreal Protocol with science at their core stressing that “so long as scientists remain vigilant, new production or emission of ozone depleting chemicals will not go unnoticed.” Executive Secretary Birmpili reminded OEWG 40 that the Ozone Research Managers Report at COP 11/MOP 29 urged continued monitoring of ozone as well as ozone-depleting substances, and, that such activities require funding.

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From L-R: Ozone Secretariat Executive Secretary Tina Birmpili; Josef Plank, Secretary-General, Federal Ministry of Sustainability and Tourism, Austria; OEWG 40 Co-Chair Yaqoub Al-Matouq, Kuwait; and Paul Krajnik, Austria

Josef Plank, Secretary-General, Federal Ministry of Sustainability and Tourism, Austria

Ozone Secretariat Executive Secretary Tina Birmpili

Ana Maria Kleymeyer, Federated States of Micronesia (FSM)

Enoh Peter Ayuk, Cameroon

Leslie Smith, Grenada

OEWG 40 Co-Chairs Cindy Newberg, US, and Yaqoub Al-Matouq, Kuwait

Participants networking during the lunch break

Jen Allan, and Beate Antonich, IISD

Highlights for Tuesday, 10 July 2018

The Vienna International Centre

The workshop on Energy Efficiency Opportunities While Phasing-Down Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) continued and concluded on Tuesday, 10 July 2018, at the United Nations Office in Vienna, Austria.

Participants heard presentations and engaged in discussions during two sessions on:

  • policies for improving the energy efficiency of small refrigeration, air-conditioning, and heat-pump (RACHP) appliances; and
  • policies for improving the energy efficiency of RACHP systems in commercial buildings, industry, and urban environments.

In the afternoon, the workshop rapporteurs summarized key messages from their respective sessions. These include:

  • utilizing the technical potential to improve efficiency and overcoming the lack of uptake by consumers requires financial support and consumer outreach;
  • monitoring energy consumption is important and energy management systems can forecast future energy demand and energy efficiency opportunities;
  • monitoring leaks as well as design and maintenance practices are critical for improving energy efficiency; and
  • harmonizing measurement methods is required to improve the collection of data on energy efficiency.

The conclusions of the workshop will be presented to the 40th Meeting of the Open-Ended Working Group (OEWG 40), which opens on Wednesday, 11 July. As Ozone Secretariat Executive Secretary Tina Birmpili explained, "energy efficiency is relatively new to the process and it is up to parties to decide on how to take this matter forward." OEWG 40 will also consider the 2018 Technology and Economic Assessment Panel (TEAP) report, including a task force report specifically on issues related to energy efficiency while phasing down HFCs.

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From L-R: Melanie Slade, International Energy Agency (IEA); Veerle Beelaerts, Directorate General for Energy, EU; Chris Dunstan, Institute for Sustainable Futures, Australia; Maria Vargas, Energy Star, US; Cheng Jianhong, China National Institute of Standardization; and Kofi Agyarko, Energy Commission, Ghana

Maria Vargas, Energy Star, US

Veerle Beelaerts, Directorate General for Energy, EU

Kofi Agyarko, Energy Commission, Ghana

Gabby Dreyfus, Kigali Cooling Efficiency Programme

Howard Geller, Southwest Energy Efficiency Project, US

Toby Peters, University of Birmingham, UK

Saurabh Kumar, Energy Efficiency Services Limited, India

Husamuddin Ahmadzai, Sweden, with Bassam Elassaad, TEAP

Juliet Kabera, Rwanda, and Taha Mohammed Zatari, Saudi Arabia

Highlights for Monday, 9 July 2018

Gunter Fischer, European Investment Bank Group, discussing with fellow panelists

The two-day Workshop on Energy Efficiency Opportunities While Phasing-Down Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) opened on Monday, 9 July 2018, at the United Nations Office in Vienna, Austria.

The Workshop was mandated by the Twenty-ninth Meeting of the Parties (MOP 29) to the Montreal Protocol in November 2017. MOP 29 recognized the importance of energy efficiency in the transition from high-global warming potential (GWP) HFCs to low-GWP alternatives in the refrigeration, air-conditioning, and heat-pump (RACHP) sectors.

Ozone Secretariat Executive Secretary Tina Birmpili welcomed workshop participants. She invited discussions on:

  • technical opportunities that can improve efficiency;
  • barriers to seizing these opportunities;
  • policy measures and investment activities to overcome barriers; and
  • connections between Montreal Protocol activities to phase-down HFCs and other activities addressing the RACHP energy efficiency issues.

Day one of the workshop was divided into sessions that discussed:

  • background to energy efficiency in RACHP sectors;
  • improving efficiency of new and of existing RACHP systems; and
  • a panel discussion on investment and financing opportunities.

The workshop continues Tuesday, 10 July 2018, and its conclusions will be presented to OEWG 40 for further consideration.

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Dan Teng'o, Communications Officer, Ozone Secretariat

Ozone Secretariat Executive Secretary Tina Birmpili

From L-R: Kevin Fay, Executive Director, Alliance for Responsible Atmospheric Policy; Archana Walia, Director, Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program (CLASP), India; and Ray Gluckman, Gluckman Consulting, UK

Hakam Zummo, Saudi Energy Efficiency Programme

Raul Simonetti, Carel, Italy

Samuel Pare, Burkina Faso, and Gilbert Bankobeza, Ozone Secretariat

Salome Margaret Molefe, with Obed Baloyi, South Africa


Daily Web CoverageAbout | 9 Jul | 10 Jul | 11 Jul | 12 Jul | 13 Jul | 14 Jul | Summary

IISD Reporting Services is grateful to the many donors of the Earth Negotiations Bulletin (ENB) and recognizes the following as core contributors to the ENB: the European Union and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. General Support for the Bulletin during 2018 is provided by the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), the Italian Ministry for the Environment, Land and Sea, the Japanese Ministry of Environment (through the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies - IGES), the New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, the Swedish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Government of Switzerland (Swiss Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN)), and SWAN International. Funding for translation of the Bulletin into French has been provided by the Government of France, Québec, the Wallonia, and the Institute of La Francophonie for Sustainable Development (IFDD), a subsidiary body of the International Organization of La Francophonie (OIF).